Clerkship Updates: ER, Endocrinology and Residency Applications

Time has just been flying by! After an incredible experience on my Palliative Care rotation, I went on to complete a month of Emergency Room Medicine. The pace was fast and challenging but was definitely a good learning experience. The month consisted of daytime as well as evening and night shifts. The skill that I felt I had the opportunity to work on most in the ER was to develop a logical, organized way of structuring a differential diagnosis for the most common, life-threatening conditions.

After my month in the ER, I went on to start a one month elective in Endocrinology which I will be wrapping up this week. I chose this elective because I felt it would be very useful for increasing my knowledge on conditions such as diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypo/hyperthyroidism and other endocrine or metabolic abnormalities that I am likely to come across often during my Family Medicine practice. It has been a good experience with my days consisting of clinic, wards and ER consults.

And in other exciting news, I have been working on my applications for residency and am making good progress. The application consists of various components including a personal statement, CV, and recommendation letters. Despite how stressful this stage of medical school can be, I feel remarkably at peace and am sure that everything will turn out for the best. Regardless of the outcome, I feel extremely grateful for all the blessings in my life and thank God for his faithfulness!

I am really looking forward to the next month of clerkship which will be a Family Medicine elective in my community. Stay tuned!

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Beautiful Fall day with my munchkins

Featured image courtesy of healthcatalyst.com

Third Year of Medical School…Done!

I can hardly believe that I am done with the third year of medical school! Despite the ups and downs, I am very happy with how much I have grown and learned during the course of this year.

These last 2 months, I have been busy with Internal Medicine Wards and Surgical Subspecialty rotations (Urology and Vascular Surgery). They were hard work but also a great learning experience overall!

All my electives for fourth year have been booked and confirmed (Palliative Care, Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Clinical Allergy and Immunology).  I will also be doing my Geriatrics and Emergency Medicine rotations during fourth year.

Now is that time of the year when we start thinking about the residency match! I cannot believe that this time next year, I will be starting residency! (As a recap, my plan is to apply to Family Medicine which I am very passionate about!)

For now, I am looking forward to the next month which is a month of summer vacation. I am excited to spend more time with my hubby, kids, extended family and friends. I am so grateful for their support and encouragement through this past year (which was undoubtedly, one of the most difficult I have encountered!). I thank God for the strength and grace He gave me throughout the year!

Thank you to all my readers for continuing to follow and support my blog. It is always appreciated!

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Breakfast on the deck, beautiful sunshine, birds chirping and a cute bunny skipping through the grass!
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Residency match timeline!

Summer Rest and Reading!

The past few weeks have been restful and refreshing as I have gotten to spend precious time with my dear husband, beautiful children and wonderful friends and family. I have had moments to pause and realize just how much I have to be thankful for!

One of the nicest things about being on summer break is simply enjoying the pleasure of reading books! My husband recently introduced me to the website bookbub.com where you can download books from Amazon and other sources at ridiculously low prices ($1 to $2 usually) or even free. If you are a booklover, then bookbub is a must have! Needless to say, my Kindle is bursting at the seams!

So what’s on my summer reading list? Here are a few select titles that I have enjoyed:

  • The Real Doctor Will See You Shortly by Matt McCarthy: The experiences of an Internal Medicine Intern
  • Praying for your Children by Elmer L. Towns and David Earley: A great guide to diligently praying for your children with guidance from scripture.
  • At the Feet of Jesus by Joanna Weaver: This is a great devotional to take a moment from our busy lives and simply spend time in God’s presence daily.

My other reading materials this summer included Case Files Obstetrics and Gynecology in preparation for my OBGYN outpatient clinic that begins in just 2 weeks time! I love the Case Files series in general because you work through several cases and it provides clinical pearls and practice questions at the end of each chapter.

Learn-French-Comprehension

My other goal for this summer has been to practice my conversational French in order to become more proficient and have better communication with my future Francophone patients. I want to provide the best possible care to my patients and not let language barriers be a hindrance to this. So far, I have been focusing on learning anatomy and history taking in French as well as listening to podcasts on a variety of topics in French. Just 10 to 20 minutes a day has produced drastic improvements in my comprehension and vocabulary!

Pictures from Summer 2018!

 

Featured image: View of Ottawa, Summer 2018 by potentialdoctor.com

 

Spring, Updates on Rotations…and Looking Ahead to Clerkship!

Hello everyone!

The past few months have just flown by! We are slowly starting to see the signs of Spring after a long Winter! One of my favorite things about this time of year is seeing the green shoots of plants in the garden trying to make their way up out of the recently frozen ground, their tips emerging strong and ready for the next season! I also love hearing the honking sound of the Canadian Geese making their way back as the weather gets warmer!

Med school has been great! I completed a fun 2-week rotation in Pediatrics where we got some hands on practice taking a history and doing physical exams on patients ranging from a few months old to teenagers! I was based at 2 locations: a pediatric clinic as well as the Children’s Hospital where I shadowed a fantastic pediatic nephrologist. I felt very at ease with parents and young patients, perhaps because I have two little ones of my own. So as I spoke to parents, I thought about how I would want to be treated if my own kids were sick.

My next rotation was an 8-week rotation in Internal Medicine which I am just about to wrap up. I found it quite challenging at the beginning when faced with the complexities of the diseases I encountered on the wards and witnessing very sick patients compared to my previous patient encounters. As time went on, I began to feel more comfortable on the wards. At this point in our training, we still play mostly an observational role, but it was a really good experience getting to interact with patients, write up admission notes and work through differential diagnoses. Even just getting more familiar with the hospital’s electronic medical records was reassuring for me!

Aside from the invaluable experience we are getting as we transition to clerkship, I am also enjoying getting to know my classmates in more depth now that we are working in smaller numbers and it is easier to get to know people.

In other exciting news, we just received our schedules for Clerkship! Here’s what my next 2 years are going to look like:

  • Year 3: Obstetrics, Pediatrics, Elective, Family Medicine, Psychiatry, Internal Medicine, Surgery
  • Year 4: Electives, Emergency Medicine, Public Health, Geriatrics

In the lead up to clerkship, I have had mixed feelings…both excitement and fear. My main concern has been the longer work hours and how that would impact my husband and kids. But my husband continues to reassure me that we will “figure it out” as we have always done! I continue to rely on God’s strength to keep me positive and motivated! And I am thrilled to see my kids thriving and happy. They are so curious to know what I am learning, “What did you do in med school today, mummy?” I love it!

All-in-all, I am really looking forward to Clerkship in this next phase of our medical training. In the mean time, I am getting ready for my next 8-week pre-clerkship rotation which is a combination of…Surgery, Radiology, Anesthesiology and Ophthalmology. Here we go!

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It’s beginning to look a lot like Spring! Some green shoots in our garden!
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Still a lot of snow in the mountains though…picture of the Laurentians from my mother-in-law’s house in the woods
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This is the study spot that I sometimes sneak away to while we’re at my mother-in-law’s house in the woods. It used to be my husband’s bedroom during his childhood summers.
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And I just had to throw this in because I think it’s so cute…our Superwoman!

Featured image: My view from the train during my daily commute to med school.

Year 2 Reflections…Challenges Make Us Stronger

This week was refreshing as we started the final block of the Fundamentals of Medicine: The Nervous System and Human Behavior. The previous block (Reproduction) was surprisingly one of the most challenging blocks for me due to the sensitive nature of some of the topics such as complications in pregnancy. It was difficult to listen to the lecture on miscarriage having personally experienced the trauma of a miscarriage 7 years ago. It felt like I was reliving the experience and I found myself thinking about my dear, sweet, unborn child that I never got to meet.

Moments like this plus settling my son into Grade 1, helping him with homework, occasionally managing on my own while my husband was away, plus the pressure of exams, made things seem overwhelming at times (there were definitely plenty of tears). But I continually remind myself how grateful I am to be in medical school and how much I enjoy it. And in those moments when I was really down, I thank God for his indescribable peace and grace that sustained me. I thank God for my wonderful husband, who despite experiencing his own stress and pressure at work, continues to support me and stand by me on this journey. I thank God for my family and friends who continue to pray for me and motivate me. Sometimes I feel as if I am a marathon runner who has supporters running alongside me shouting, “Keep going! Don’t give up! Keep your eye on the prize!”

One of my dearest cousins used to tell me that nothing worth having in life ever comes easily. This needn’t scare us about trying things and stretching ourselves beyond our comfort zone! It is worth the effort, tears and sweat in the end!

I am truly excited to be learning about the human brain, nervous system and behavior over the next few weeks. This week in the anatomy lab, I had the rare privilege of holding a human brain in my hands. I hope this will not be too gruesome for some of you to read but I had to write this to express my sincere appreciation for the magnificence of the human body and for those people who donated themselves for our educational learning. To be holding the essence of this individual’s personality, memories, hopes and dreams in my hands made me reflect on how important each life is.

Featured Image by Potential Doctor: Sunset view of Montreal after a hike up Mont Royal 

 

Gratitude: Appreciating the Big and the Little Things

One of the things that I wanted to improve on from my last year in medical school was learning to slow down and appreciate the little things around me. I loathed the fact that mornings were rushed and it seemed like we were always ordering the kids around and rushing them out the door. With better time management and changes to our parenting approach, the mornings during the past week have been beautiful. I know that not every morning will go smoothly but I am simply grateful for those that do. This morning I felt grateful for 4 things:

  1. Brushing my little girl’s hair: I had dreamed of doing this ever since I was a teenager. After my first pregnancy ended in a traumatic miscarriage, it sometimes seems like a dream that both she and my son are actually here in my life.
  2. Getting hugs from my dear son: As I was getting things ready this morning, my son suddenly stopped me and said, “Mummy, I want to do something”…he then enveloped me in a deep, long hug. Moments like these make the challenges of motherhood seem more than worth it!
  3. Being in medical school: As I looked over the voluminous material I need to learn over the next few weeks, I simply sat back and drank in the fact that although it’s a challenge, I am doing what I have been wanting to do for so long…and I love it!
  4. My Heavenly Father: I love the scripture in Psalms that describes God as a “Father to the fatherless” and a “Defender“. Having lost my father unexpectedly when I was 5 years old, I truly have seen God be a Father to me through the years. Despite the ups and downs, He has always been there for me. He is my hope and everlasting peace!

Take a moment to stop and reflect. What are you grateful for today?

Featured image courtesy of versiondaily.com

When Striving Towards Your Goal Feels Like a Marathon

There is no doubt that medical school sometimes feels like a marathon. There are moments of high energy and exhilaration. There are also moments when we feel like we are running out of fuel. The pace is fast, intense and requires consistent focus. If there is anything I am learning, it is absolutely necessary to take moments to slow down, reflect and catch our breath. Why are we doing this in the first place? Do we still have our eyes on the finish line? Are we taking time to enjoy the scenery as we run the race?

This week I felt exhausted from all the demands of medical school and family life. I woke up this morning feeling mentally and emotionally tired. I went before God in prayer asking for strength that only He can give. As I opened my Bible, I came across verses that immediately encouraged me and reminded me that it’s ok to feel weak sometimes. It’s ok to fall on our knees, hang our head and call out for some help. In that moment, we just need to take stock of the attitudes permeating our hearts and minds, and lift our head back up to keep our eyes fixed firmly on our prize. We will get to the end of the race and reach our goals in due time!

Be strong and courageous. Do not be afraid; do not be discouraged, for the Lord your God will be with you wherever you go.” Joshua 1:9

I press on towards the goal…” Philippians 3:14

Be joyful always, pray continually, give thanks in all circumstances” I Thessalonians 5:16-18

Photo credit: http://www.towpathmarathon.net/