Ten Tips to Be at Your Best on MCAT Exam Day

You’ve studied. You’ve given it your best. And now exam day is nearly here. I would like to share with you some tips that helped me to be at my best in the lead up to the MCAT and finally on the day of the exam itself.

  1. Start getting to bed early and slow down on studying: Because the exam is now about 7 hours long, there are no options to take the exam in the afternoon. Therefore you are going to have to be at the testing center by about 7:30am at the latest for the exam that starts at 8am. Training your body to get up early will help to ensure you get a full nights rest before the exam and give you the stamina to get through the exam and ace it! Depending on your philosophy, taking a day-off from studying the day and night before the exam could be a good way to give you a small break before you take the actual exam.
  2. Psychological factors:  I drove to the testing center location (which was 30 minutes away) two days before the exam, scouted out the parking options and went right into the testing center to see what the layout looked like. This had a profound effect on my frame of mind the day of the exam because I knew exactly where I needed to go. I wasn’t worrying about it the night before the exam. Not everyone has the luxury of going to the testing center beforehand. But in my situation, I found it to be a big psychological help to have been to the testing center before the actual exam.
  3. Take a deep breath: Before I started each section of the exam, I would take some deep breaths and try to get focused before diving into the passage and questions. It’s true that you have to be fast on the exam, but you can probably afford 5-10 seconds before the start of each section to regroup your thoughts.
  4. Test-taking strategies: You may have developed a strategy for answering questions as you went through the practice tests. Mine was not to linger on a question for more than 1 minute. If I was stuck, I marked it and came back to it at the end of the section. Also, if a passage had a lot of dense information, I did not read the passage word for word. I breezed over it quickly for the general idea then looked at the questions to determine what was really needed from the passage. This will save you time as a lot of information on the passages is extraneous.
  5. What is the basic science? As you have probably already gleaned from the practice tests, there are some passages where it will seem like you have no idea what the passage is about. The material will be disguising itself under a veil of the unknown. Try to remind yourself that the MCAT generally only tests the fundamentals of science you have studied. Try to tease this out from the passage and apply what you know.
  6. One answer is more “correct” than the other: There will be some answer choices that both seem “correct” however you have to ask yourself whether the answer is addressing the question being asked. Pay attention to key words like “Except”, “Most likely”, “Explicitly”, “Implicitly. This will guide you to the truly correct answer.
  7. Carry snacks, lunch and water: Its important to keep your energy up so carry enough food and water to sustain you throughout the day.
  8. Breaks are shorter than you think: Depending on the number of examinees and the level of security at your testing center, allow 2-4 minutes total to be “processed” in and out of the exam room every time you leave for a scheduled break. The 10 minute breaks in particular go by very fast so be quick if you need to go to the bathroom and have a snack. Psychologically, you don’t want to end up feeling flustered because the next section started before you got back to your seat.
  9. Finish a section and then forget about it: From my own experience and from other MCAT takers I have spoken to, it is difficult to judge your performance from how you feel. Therefore, I decided that no matter how I felt about a section, I was not going to dwell on it once it was finished. I was going to give the next section my best shot no matter how discouraged or unsure I felt about the previous section.
  10. Don’t give up: By the time I got to the last section of the exam (Psychology), my brain was exhausted. I had a hard time concentrating on the passage and was finding myself unhelpfully re-reading it over and over. I stopped reading, looked down at my desk, said a prayer for strength, took a few deep breaths and kept going. Don’t get discouraged. The MCAT is a marathon but you can make it through to the end! Taking a few seconds here and there to regroup your thoughts can be helpful in renewing your focus.

I wish you the very best as you prepare for your exam. You can do it!

Related posts:

How to Achieve Success on the MCAT…Lessons Learned from Two Retakes

Ten Strategies to Avoid Burnout While Preparing for the MCAT

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at freedigitalphotos.net
Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at freedigitalphotos.net
Advertisements

Tell me what you think!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s